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Short Course: Therapy,exercise aid in chemo-related menopause

Therapy,exercise aid in chemo-related menopause

Written by Agencies |
October 13, 2012 2:45:01 am

Therapy,exercise aid in chemo-related menopause

NEW YORK: Younger women who are thrust into menopause because of breast cancer treatment may get some relief from talk therapy and regular exercise,a new study from the Netherlands suggests. Symptoms including hot flashes and vaginal dryness often come on gradually for women who go through natural menopause,as the body’s production of hormones slowly dwindles. But that’s not often the case for women who are diagnosed with breast cancer before menopause and treated with chemotherapy and other potent drugs. “With women with breast cancer who experience treatment-induced menopause,the symptoms are much more severe than in natural menopause,” said Neil Aaronson from The Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam,who worked on the study. What’s more,those women shouldn’t take replacement hormones — an effective but controversial treatment for menopause-related symptoms — because they can put them at risk of a cancer recurrence. For the new study,Aaronson and his colleagues randomly assigned 422 women with breast cancer and treatment-induced menopause to one of four groups.

Mobile phone data helps map malaria spread in Kenya

LONDON: Mobile phone data can help scientists map how human travel patterns contribute to the spread of the malaria,a new study has found. Between June 2008 and June 2009,the researchers mapped every call or text made by each of 14,816,521 Kenyan mobile phone subscribers to one of 11,920 cell towers located in 692 different settlements. Every time an individual left his or her primary settlement,the destination and duration of each journey was calculated. Using a malaria prevalence map to estimate the disease’s prevalence in each location being studied,the researchers inferred each resident’s probability of being infected and the daily probability that visitors to particular areas would become infected. “This is the first time that such a massive amount of cell phone data has been used,together with detailed infectious disease data,to understand how a disease is spreading,” Professor Caroline Buckee,Harvard School of Public Health and lead author of the study,said.

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