Tuesday, December 07, 2021

These are the 5 things I learnt from a workshop on how to take a great selfie

I attended a workshop on 'the art of selfies', and this is what I learnt.

Written by Pallavi Chattopadhyay | New Delhi |
July 19, 2016 7:13:53 pm
how to take a selfie, selfie taking tips, takes selfies like a pro, professional selfies, photography worskhop, Taking selfies is all about the angles. (Source: Thinkstock Images)

Highly intrigued by the name of the workshop, “The Art of Selfies”, I turned up at Experimental Arts Gallery at India Habitat Centre a few days ago, where the focus lay on our current generation’s favourite past-times and point of obsession – clicking selfies. A high social networking addict hooked to posting selfies on the go, as I entered the first-of-its-kind day-long workshop with photographer Parthiv Shah, with a sceptical frame of mind, I came out with a better sense of the various possibilities of the selfies.

Part of the year-long photography festival Habitat Photosphere, Shah shed light on the selfie trend managing to even reach space, when Japanese astronaut Aki Hoshide turned the camera on himself during his expedition in space in 2012 at the International Space Station. His selfie encompassing the sun, the Earth and portions of a robotic arm and a spacesuit, set against the darkness of space, opened up a world of looking at selfies as a gateway of creating a piece of art that could be put on a wall, much like a self-portrait.

Following are a few tips I – along with the youngsters who are experts of the art and the selfie-challenged 70-year-olds – learnt at the workshop, to help equip ourselves with the right skills in putting our best face forward:

1. Look beyond the face:

A selfie does not necessarily have to revolve around the face. It could serve as an insight into one’s personality, likes, surrounding, holiday, clothing or could also be a quick try at abstract photography. One of the audience members took a selfie of their finger pointing towards a ceramic sculpture of the fossil remains of a fish, stationed at the venue, to convey her interest in ceramics. Shah also displayed the photograph of a traveler, who with the help of his selfie stick, shot the sculpture of a war hero seated on a horse in the background during his backpacking Europe trip, and simultaneously managed to capture himself with his entire backpack in the frame. Let your selfies do the talking. Here I took a selfie in the newsroom, well, mainly because that’s where I am most of the times!

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2. Eliminate the double chin:

For those who hate the thought and sight of looking at their double chin, caught within a fraction of a second in their phones, can move the phone is varying angles by moving the hand left to right, from 0 to 180 degrees, to get the best angle for a better frame.

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3. Eyes indirect:

Try not to look directly into the camera, as it give the impression of the eyes squinting at the centre, and makes the subject appear funny. Instead, look into the camera side ways for a better impression.

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4. Do a Mona Lisa:

Much like an artist’s portrait, try not to have the full-face facing the camera. Step into the artist’s shoes and much like Van Gogh’s or Mona Lisa’s portrait, show only three-fourths of your face.

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5. Up top:

Last but not the least, one of the best angles to click the selfie is not at arm’s length, but instead from top.

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Of course, these are many other ways of decoding the perfect selfie, but these tips could come in handy the next time you are thinking of making your selfies a little more interesting and less ordinary.

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