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Monday, October 18, 2021

The Magic of Four

Bioscope, screened at the 13th Pune International Film Festival, is an anthology of short Marathi films, based on well-known poems.

New Delhi |
January 15, 2015 3:28:41 pm
Ravi Jadhav’s short film Mitraa is based on Sandip Khare’s poem inspired by legendary writer Vijay Tendulkar’s story on homosexuality. Ravi Jadhav’s short film Mitraa is based on Sandip Khare’s poem inspired by legendary writer Vijay Tendulkar’s story on homosexuality.

– By Alifiya Khan

Screen 3 of Mangala Theatre in Pune wore an unusual look on Monday. The screening of Bioscope began with the narration in the voice of eminent lyricist-poet Gulzar, leaving the audience listening to each and every word in rapt attention, only to break into endless claps and whistles as the narration ended with his face appearing on the screen. The claps and whistles returned every half an hour, each time one of the four films that formed the anthology ended. Bioscope was showcased as part of the 13th Pune International Film Festival.

Some time in December 2012, four Marathi film directors met at an event in Thane and decided to do “something different”. “Believe it or not, that’s how it began,” says Girish Mohite, one of the four directors.

“We decided to pick our favourite poems and make them the basis for our short films. It’s for the first time that an anthology is being made that is inspired by poems,” said Gajendra Ahire, whose short film Dil-e-Nadaan is based on Mirza Ghalib’s well-known ghazal by the same name.

Ravi Jadhav’s short film Mitraa is based on Sandip Khare’s poem inspired by legendary writer Vijay Tendulkar’s story on homosexuality. Khare, who will be making his acting debut in this film, says Tendulkar’s famous play Mitrachi Goshta written in the ’60s, was way ahead ahead of its times. “But the film goes beyond a lesbian relationship. The story brings forth the insecurities of a girl, who discovers her sexuality and at the same time, has to deal with her childhood friend Vinay’s attraction to her,” he says.

Viju Mane’s Ek Hota Kau is composed by actor-poet Kishor Kadam and Mohite’s film Bail is based on Loknath Yashwant’s poem by the same name. Bail deals with farmers’ suicides but with a twist. “The story is told through the eyes of an ox. It shows the frustration of cotton-growing farmers in the state,” says Mohite, who has dealt with the subject of farmer suicides in the past as well, and says the situation hasn’t changed a bit.
While all four films deal with four different subjects, there is still a common thread that weaves it together. “All four films have pain at their core; the pain of a bleeding heart,” says Khare.

The film will travel to other film festivals across the country and looks to a theatre release in April this year.

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