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Taxis charged by Delhi airport authorities, High Court asks why

Radio cab company Magic Sewa had approached the court alleging that DIAL had “arbitrarily” imposed charges “without authority” to “favour” certain cab companies with whom it had entered into agreements.

Written by Aneesha Mathur | New Delhi |
May 18, 2016 3:21:25 am
Delhi High Court, Delhi International Airport, DIAL, Radio cab, Magic Sewa, indian express, delhi news The lawyer also argued that there was no need for permission from the AAI or the Airports Economic Regulatory Authority (AERA), as it was “not an aeronautical tariff”.

The Delhi High Court Tuesday asked Delhi International Airport Ltd (DIAL) to explain how it had imposed entry charges of Rs 150 on commercial passenger vehicles entering the airport arrivals area.

Radio cab company Magic Sewa had approached the court alleging that DIAL had “arbitrarily” imposed charges “without authority” to “favour” certain cab companies with whom it had entered into agreements.

Advocate Pranav Sachdeva, appearing for Magic Sewa, alleged that DIAL had imposed the entry charges on taxis entering the airport to “privilege favoured” operators — Meru cabs, Easy Cabs and Mega cabs, which have “contracts with DIAL” to provide cab services from the airport.

The plea has said that all radio cab services licenced by the Delhi government should be free to enter the airport.

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The lawyer also alleged that “huge sums of money” were being charged every month by GMR, which has a 49.99 per cent stake in DIAL, even though the Airport Authority of India (AAI) had not imposed any such charges at any other airport in the country.

“How are you levying entry fee to enter the airport? What authority do you have to levy charges?” asked Justice Manmohan.

The counsel appearing for DIAL, however, argued that the DIAL had “stepped into the shoes” of the AAI for “certain statutory rights” and had imposed charges as a “deterrent” to ensure that cabs did not idle at the airport arrivals area and create traffic jams.

The lawyer also argued that there was no need for permission from the AAI or the Airports Economic Regulatory Authority (AERA), as it was “not an aeronautical tariff”.

The bench has for now reserved its judgment on the plea, and has asked both parties to file short written submissions.

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