Friday, Oct 07, 2022

Seminar on academia tie-up with India Inc

A lecture on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and biotechnology by a top Indian scientist turned into a brainstorming session at IIM-Ahmedabad on Tuesday.

A lecture on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and biotechnology by a top Indian scientist turned into a brainstorming session at IIM-Ahmedabad on Tuesday.

“Ultimately,we would like Indian industry to tie-up with Indian institutions,” said Girish Sahni,director of the CSIR-funded Institute of Microbial Technology (IMTECH) at Chandigarh,which had developed the third and fourth generation thrombolytic molecules eventually licensed to a US firm for 150 million dollars recently. He was speaking at the seminar on stagnant Indian Industry- Indian academia linkage.

The licensed technology is known as a clot-buster,effectively a molecule that bursts to free the arteries of a person suffering from coronary disease,of clots. A biotechnology development,it is expected to replace drugs that are used on such patients but which may lead to excessive bleeding due to cancellation of clotting in some cases as they act more generally.

In an interview later,Sahni said he had no answer why Indian industry seems generally to have little confidence in Indian academia.

Subscriber Only Stories
JK Cement’s SPSU Udaipur Launches ‘Golden Batch 2022’ In Collaboration Wi...Premium
Appendicitis in Children- A new lifestyle disorderPremium
Re-Defining The Tradition In Folk Art: An Art Educator’s PerspectivePremium
Symbiosis School of Sports Sciences (SSSS) launches undergraduate program...Premium

“I don’t know. You should ask them,” he said.

Sahni narrated how Nostrom Pharmaceuticals had enough confidence to invest in their research,which led to members of his team not only receiving many extra benefits and pay hikes,but how it gave them a new-found confidence.

His team members were not professors but technicians,post-doctorals,even basic Masters of Sciences. This was another part of the ad-hoc discussion,initiated by an answer and question round on “What can be done about students who are not top of the line? What are the avenues for them?”

Advertisement

One of Sahni’s team members,whom he referred to as Shilpa,was an MSc Botany student who,after the team tied up with Nostrum,moved to the UK for higher studies and eventually is on her way to become an entrepreneur.

“There are many students who are not really top of their class,and who are not from the top institutes. But they can be very good human resources for industry,especially for repetitive and constant jobs. There are almost no avenues for such types of students. Sadly,the industry has not woken up to the fact that,like Shilpa,it is good business sense and very rewarding to hire these kind of students,” Sahni added.

First published on: 09-02-2011 at 04:26:39 am
Next Story

Praful carries his tarmac privilege to new ministry

Latest Comment
Post Comment
Read Comments
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
X